Home : News : Article Display

The ART of training the total force

The three-day conference allowed Airmen Resiliency Team members from throughout the geographically separated Wing to connect with over 160 peers from other services and nations, increase their knowledge of the challenges analysts are facing, and hone their skills to make a greater impact on the Airmen they support.

Lt. Col. Alan Olan, 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing psychologist, Capt. Timothy Warf, 480th ISR Group chaplain, Maj. Joel Kornegay, 432nd ISRW, head chaplain, listen while Maj. Jason Knudeson, 480th ISRW chaplain, speaks during the panel discussion portion of the Total Force Integration Conference July 17-19, 2018, at Joint Base Andrews, Md. The three-day conference allowed Airmen Resiliency Team members from throughout the geographically separated Wing to connect with over 160 peers from other services and nations, increase their knowledge of the challenges analysts are facing, and hone their skills to make a greater impact on the Airmen they support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Darnell T. Cannady)

JOINT BASE ANDREWS, Md. --

Intelligence analysts sit in front of computer monitors, closely watching images of an ongoing mission, but they are feeling stressed. The reason for this stress could vary, from work to personal issues. Whatever the reason, the analysts may not be performing to their maximum capability, until they are suddenly interrupted with a simple question, “How are you doing today?”

The question was posed by an Airmen Resiliency Team member whose job it is to identify the stressors analysts experience, teach them the techniques to strengthen their resiliency and provide them, and their families, with physical, mental and spiritual support.  

In July, the 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing’s ART held a Total Force Integration Conference at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, allowing ART members from throughout the geographically separated Wing to connect for three days with over 160 peers from other services and nations, increase their knowledge of the challenges analysts are facing, and to hone team member’s skills.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for us to cross train with our Total Force partners,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Alan Ogle, 480th ISRW psychologist. “This is really a new type of warfare, and we have to train our chaplains and medics to best support these remote warfighters. As a military medic, it’s an honor and a responsibility that we go where they are, when they are making life and death decisions, to support them as best as we possibly can.”

The ARTs are comprised of mental health, physical health and chaplain professionals embedded directly within ISR units to provide support and care to the remote warfighters.

“The ART is important because we are a member of each unit, each mission and each team,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Laquanya Mason-Coyner, superintendent of wing medical operations. “We’re not only a team among ourselves, but we become a part of the unit we are helping. We further the unit’s mission success by helping each member to become more resilient.”

The keynote speaker at the conference, U.S. Navy Capt. Matthew Kleiman, Joint Surgeon Office National Guard Bureau director of psychological health programs, discussed the need to work collaboratively across different lines of efforts.

“This conference is about our psychological health specialists, Department of Public Health, chaplains and those individuals that are supporting our Soldiers and Airmen,” said Kleiman. “Providing that support in an environment where we can be effective, get to someone who may be struggling on some level, back into the fight, and by working in a holistic and integrated way with all of our mission support specialists, is critical to accomplishing that goal.”

“We all have the same essential mission which is to support the readiness of the total force so I’m always happy when I see we’re bringing together folks from the different services and crossing over from the active to the reserves and guard,” he added.

The mission of taking care of Airmen is not only an active duty job. This conference was the first to include ISR and remotely piloted aircraft National Guard ART members. Maj. Jason Knudeson, 480th ISRW chaplain, said it is vital that active duty ISR component members be integrated with all their Total Force partners.

“To finally come together with Guardsmen to do training to build resiliency teams across the enterprise is exciting to me,” said Knudeson. “They are getting insight on what it would look like to do an intra-disciplinary collaborative team, and I see some excitement and ideas popping into our teammate’s minds. They are our brothers and sisters in uniform. If we can strengthen them and the Airmen that work at the Guard sites, it’s a win-win.”

“There is a comradery that is being built,” said Col Timothy Gregory, deputy director of the Air National Guard chaplain corps. “People are gaining information and developing new knowledge. I hope they gain a better understanding of the roles that each of the professionals play in caring for Airmen, what their roles are and how to leverage and maximize the team’s ability to serve Airmen.”

The conference not only provided insight to U.S. service members, but also to international partners who are building their ART capabilities.

“There is a huge depth of experience here to learn from,” said Squadron Leader Andrea MacFarlane of United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force.  “You’ve got a collection of experts in these areas; they’ve really done a lot of work and research, so their theories and models are backed up and credible. It’s important to learn from the similarities, learn what we can take forward, and hopefully this could be the start of something which would help us as the years go forward.”

Whether it was learning about the effects of sleep deprivation, healthy eating or dealing with stress, ART members collaborated at the conference with other professionals so they can be equipped with the right tools to address any issue their analysts might experience. ‘

Tech. Sgt. Vashon Bynum, 693rd ISR Group physical health technician, spoke during the conference about how physical health, fitness and preventative health medicine approaches bolster an Airman’s resiliency for mission success.

“The human aspect is the most important aspect,” said Bynum. “They haven’t found a great way to replace us, so you have to invest in the actual human being. If we don’t invest in making sure folks are mentally, physically and spiritually resilient, and able to thrive, then ultimately the mission fails.”

USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.